Why I Blog

In my last post, “Blog, Why” I shared with you:

  • a few negative comments from non-bloggers who expressed their beliefs about why people blog;
  • my inability to respond openly and honestly when asked by friends and family, “Why Do You Blog.” and
  • why I was taking time off from blogging to go within and explore “Why I Blog”.

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When I stepped away from blogging and travelled inward to find words that authentically expressed “Why I Blog,” I came up with a number of reasons and these are just a few:

      • I blog for Self-Expression – I silenced my voice many, many years ago and readily accepted the role of “listener”. But in this last season of life, I wanted to share my experiences, opinions, and rants. I needed a platform to “speak up,“speak clear, and “speak out. ” And, I found it . My voice gets stronger every day on Blogosphere as well as when I communicate with people face-to-face.
      • I blog for Self-Care – Ten years ago, it dawned on me that I have a paternal family Alzheimer’s and Dementia history. Of my three paternal aunts, two lived into their seventies, both were diagnosed with the conditions  and, the third died in her forties. My only two paternal female cousins who both lived past the age of sixty were diagnosed as well. Blogging is one of the things that I do to exercise my brain. And, staying mentally alert is especially important given my age, seventy-two, and family history.
      • I blog for Self-Education I communicate with Bloggers around the world. Through these Blogs, my life opens up to new things, places, cultures and lifestyles.  Whenever, I go to my Reader and/or visit a Blog, I can expect to learn something new.
      • I blog for Self-Awareness “Living in the Present Moment,” Stillness, and “Quiet” did not play a role in my life until I entered Blogosphere a little over two years ago. This is when yoga, meditation and mindfulness entered my space. Though, still a work-in-progress, through these practices, I now do a better job of understanding who I am and how I relate to what happens in my life both the positive and the negative.
      • I blog for Self-Love” – Blogging for me is very nurturing; and, I am worthy of doing what I enjoy and all that brings tranquility and happiness into my space.

This is my last blog post until Monday, April 27, I am taking a break to spend seven fun-filled days with my two beautiful granddaughters who will be visiting us during their spring break.

Chelsea, 23-Years-Old
Chelsea Yvonne, 23-Years-Old
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Ava Nicole, 6-Years-Old

After the granddaughters leave, Hubby and I are taking several mini vacations to celebrate our 55th Wedding Anniversary.

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Why I Choose to Live Beyond 75

One day last week, I had to stop, listen and process an interview on one of the cable news stations.

I was shocked!!  Why, was Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel saying he wanted to die at 75?

It was unbelievable.  And I asked Hubby, “was that the same Dr. Emanuel who shows up on so many national news programs speaking as an expert on health related issues, especially, the Affordable Health Care Act.”  He said, “yes, but didn’t recall the details.”

Because we both missed most of the interview, I wanted to learn more.  So, I went to my IPad and googled, “why I want to die at 75 Ezekiel Emanuel.”  My friend, Google, found a lengthy article featured in the September 2014 issue of The Atlantic written by Dr. Emanuel.  

Why I Want To Die at 75:  Ezekiel J. Emanuel, M.D.

“I am sure of my position.  Doubtless, death is a loss.  It deprives us of experiences and milestones, of time spent with our spouse and children.  In short, it deprives us of all the things we value.

But, here is a simple truth that many of us seem to resist:  living too long is also a loss.  It renders many of us, if not disabled, then faltering and declining, a state that may not be worse than death but is nonetheless deprived.  It robs us of our creativity and ability to contribute to work, society, the world.  It transforms how people experience us, and most important, remember us.  We are no longer remembered as vibrant and engaged but as feeble, ineffectual, even pathetic.”

Dr. Emanuel is a healthy 57-year-old and does not plan to end his life at 75 either by assisted-suicide or euthanasia.  But, he does say, “At 75 and beyond, I will need a good reason to even visit the doctor and take any medical test or treatment, no matter how routine and painless.  And that good reason is not — ‘it will prolong your life.'”

He also contends that in America we are so focused on doing things “like exercise, strict dieting, popping vitamins, etc., in an effort to cheat death and prolong life as long as possible.  This has become so pervasive that it now defines a culture type – what I call the American Immortal.”

Why I Choose to Live Beyond 75

Dr. Emanuel says he only wants to live until the age of 75; and, I respect his right to make this choice.  But, two years from now, if I reach the age of 75, I will continue to make healthy lifestyle choices.  These choices will be made not to prolong life, but to live life to the fullest.

While physical ailments, dementia, feebleness, memory, problem solving and other health conditions, relating to the aging process, may occur; I believe, forecasting what may happen in my future, inhibits my ability to live authentically in the present moment.

Today, I am a relatively healthy, 72-year-old with several manageable chronic illnesses.  In 2008, at the age of 66, I was diagnosed with aggressive breast cancer.  Dr. Emanuel contends if he were diagnosed with cancer, after the age of 60, he would refuse treatment.  Again, I respect his right to make that decision.  But, I chose treatment.

And, over the past six years, I have been gifted with being in the present moment when my:

  • eldest grandson graduated from college
  • eldest granddaughter graduated from high school;
  • eldest grandson graduated from high school;
  • youngest grandson, graduated from middle school; and,
  • youngest granddaughter’s birth seven months after my 2008 breast cancer diagnosis.

Had I elected not to pursue treatment, I possibly would not have lived to see these major family milestones.

Additionally, beyond family milestones, I would have never witnessed the election of America’s first African-American President.  Something that I never expected would happen in my lifetime.

So, if I continue to be blessed with sound mind and body, I plan on being an active participant in managing my aging process beyond age 75.

And, I will not:

  • wait for death;
  • refuse medical treatment; or
  • accept that living a quality life ends at 75.

But, in addition to as-needed medical care, I will continue to manage my aging process by:

  • Being Positive
  • Practicing Forgiveness
  • Staying Physical
  • Embracing Family and Friends
  • Loving Me
  • Performing Random Acts of Kinds
  • Living A Spiritual Life
  • Trying New Things
  • Exploring New Places
  • Blogging About My Memories, Life Experiences and Random Thoughts

Rather than attempting to “cheat or prolong life” I choose to live life to the fullest until God guides me down a different path.